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Jersey Consumer Council

Tag: money

Local charity launches ‘Healthy Eating Week’ and encourages islanders to eat well and eat together

May 19, 2017 Consumer Skills, Home life No Comments
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The first ever Caring Cooks of Jersey Healthy Eating Week takes place from Monday 12th June through to Saturday 17th June. The local charity which aims make nutritious and tasty food part of daily life is encouraging us all to think about how we can eat well and eat together, even when short on time and on a tight budget.

 

There are plenty of inexpensive, nutritious and delicious foods available all of which can be used to prepare healthy meals from scratch in a much shorter time than you might think. Planning your meals and smarter shopping can help you to make your money go further and help you cut down on waste too.

 

Here are just a few top tips from Caring Cooks of Jersey on how to be cost conscious but enjoy healthy, delicious and nutritious food.

 

  1. Plan your meals. Planning your weekly meals, writing – and sticking to, a shopping list will help you avoid making the impulse buys which often tip the bill over budget. Scan the shelves for lower cost items, be aware of special offers but don’t be tempted to buy something that may actually go to waste. Supermarket economy ranges can be great value and nutritionally there is often little difference to the standard or branded versions.

 

  1. Look for special offers on long shelf-life products. Stocking up on store cupboard staples such as dried pasta and rice, tinned or dried beans and pulses and tinned tomatoes can save money. All these ingredients can be used to bulk out your meals to make them go further.

 

  1. Buy cheaper cuts of meat. Use chicken thighs rather than breast for example, and whilst you may not be familiar with cooking a whole chicken, this can be great value, especially if you use it for more than one meal. A traditional roast chicken is delicious and really simple to do, then use any left overs for curry or with salad or vegetables the next day.

 

Mince is also a great ingredient, versatile and inexpensive, there are lots of tasty, satisfying dishes you can make with mince such as lasagne, bolognaise, cottage pie or one of our family favorites mince and pea curry.

 

Caring Cooks of Mince and Pea Curry Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp. vegetable oil
  • Pack of beef or lamb mince
  • 1 large onion, finely diced
  • 2 garlic cloves crushed
  • 2 fresh green chillies, deseeded and finely diced (optional)
  • 4tbsp medium curry paste
  • 1 tin chopped tomatoes
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 4 tbsp. tomato puree
  • 250g frozen peas
  • Coconut cream (optional, as it can be quite expensive)

Recipe

  1. Heat the oil in a pan and cook the onion on a low heat until lightly golden
  2. Add the garlic, chillies (if using), cumin seeds and curry paste and fry for 2-3 mins and then add the mince, cooking until it’s browned
  3. Add the tomatoes, tomato puree, sugar and 100ml cold water.
  4. Simmer for about 20 minutes, add in the frozen peas and coconut cream (if using), and cook for another 10 minutes.  Serve with boiled white or brown rice

 

Supermarkets often have ‘bulk buying’ offers on meat such as ‘three for two’ and similar. Anything you are not going to use straight away can be put in the freezer for another time.

 

  1. Make use of canned oily fish. Canned sardines and salmon can be cheaper than buying fresh fish, plus they are easy to prepare and have a long shelf life. Choose those canned in spring water to keep the salt content to a minimum. You can make fishcakes with canned tuna, cooked potatoes and chopped parsley with a squeeze of lemon. Roll the mix in flour, egg and breadcrumbs and then fry lightly. Using frozen fish is another great way to help ensure you are getting Omega 3 fats and can often be added to dishes straight from the freezer.

 

  1. Use frozen and canned fruit and vegetables. Using frozen vegetables can be cheaper than using fresh and they count towards your 5 A DAY. If you have a stock in your cupboard you can use them when you want without them going off, which cuts down on waste. But do watch out for those that have added sugar and opt for varieties in water when possible.

 

  1. Buy fresh fruit and vegetables when in season. Here in Jersey we have an abundance of wonderful, locally grown produce – make the most of it! Fresh fruit and vegetables in season are often great value and they taste fantastic.

 

Of course budget planning, shopping and cooking food from scratch can seem a little daunting, many people may never have learned to cook, or perhaps have lost their confidence in the kitchen. If that sounds familiar then why not join one of the Community Cooking Courses offered by Caring Cooks of Jersey? These courses are a great way get into the kitchen, to learn new skills in a friendly and supportive environment and to help change the way you and your family eat. The courses run over a five week period on either a Monday and Wednesday evening at Le Rocquier School, St Clement. All the ingredients are provided and each week you get to take home a tasty two course meal. For more information and to book a place visit the ‘Our Services’ section on the Caring Cooks website www.caringcooksofjersey.com.

More top tips

Use leftover vegetables to make soup. Soups made with added pasta, rice, beans, lentils or root vegetables such as sweet potatoes, parsnips, turnips and carrots are tasty, filling, cheap and freeze well.

Baked potatoes are great as a healthy and filling meal. Experiment with your favourite toppings. Make the most of having the oven on and add some extra potatoes that can then be kept for a couple of days in the fridge (or longer in the freezer) and microwaved for a quick meal another time.

Store bread in the freezer. If you don’t use bread that often and you have space in your freezer, why not freeze the loaf when you buy it and then take a few slices out as and when you need them to avoid waste.

Make your own ‘ready meals’. Simply double your usual recipes and freeze half. Dishes such as chilli, cottage pies, soups and stews all freeze well and are ideal for those days when you don’t have the time to cook.

 

 

 

 

 

 


GST and the De-Minimis Waiver

May 19, 2017 Money Matters No Comments
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Customs Explain that the De Minimis Waiver is intended to benefit an individual making a single purchase worth under £240 and shipping it to Jersey

All goods are liable to GST on import regardless of value. The de-Minimis waiver under which GST is not charged is not a right but an administrative concession designed to manage the overwhelming numbers of consignments and letter packets that would otherwise have to be charged up. The cost of handling such high volumes of low value goods outweighs the amount that would actually be collected. The de-minimis waiver ministerial decision can be found by clicking https://www.gov.je/government/planningperformance/pages/ministerialdecisions.aspx?docid=0995E584-AA0F-4CA0-96A9-A5BDF532FB64

 

The de-Minimis waiver was intended to benefit an individual making a single purchase worth under £240 and shipping it to Jersey. It was not intended to allow individuals, or indeed businesses, to make several purchases all under £240 from the same supplier on the same day hoping they will arrive separately. The Customs & Immigration Service web page on gov.je https://www.gov.je/TaxesMoney/GST/GSTCustomers/Pages/DeclaringPaying.aspx#anchor-1 clearly states that “If you order multiple items (consignments) that arrive as one shipment, we will treat this as a single delivery.”


Contactless Payments – Guidance

April 20, 2017 Banking No Comments
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Contactless Payments – Guidance

What are contactless payments?

Contactless payments allow you to make fast and secure payments for amounts up to £30 just by touching your card on the card reader.

You do not need to enter your four digit Personal Identification Number (PIN). You can make payments with debit, credit, or prepaid cards, which have the following contactless symbol: Other methods of contactless payment include mobile phone apps and wearable devices (wristbands and watches).

Some UK card providers are not currently issuing contactless payment cards, and contactless card readers are not available at all retailers.

Are contactless payments safe?

• They offer the same level of fraud protection as standard Chip and Pin transactions.
• You no longer have to enter your PIN for purchases of £30 and under. However, from time to time, you may be prompted to enter your PIN as a security measure. This is to verify you are the authorised cardholder and are in possession of your card.
• If your card is lost or stolen you may be protected against fraudulent activity and will not be liable for any losses incurred. However, if you have given your card to someone, you could be found liable.

Tips

• If you carry more than one card in your purse or wallet, take your contactless card out to make the payment. This will ensure the correct card is debited.
• Going contactless does not mean you should go without a receipt. Always accept the offer of a receipt, or request one if you are not automatically given one. This will make it easier to return goods if necessary.
• If you are not comfortable using a contactless card, or have concerns about fraud, contact your bank to enquire about their ‘opt-out’ service. Most banks offer this facility, but terms and conditions may vary.

FAQs

Q: Is it possible for a thief to copy my card information?
A: Although the risks are low, it is possible. A device would probably need to be very close to your card before a thief could copy your details without you knowing.

Q: Is it possible to make an accidental purchase?
A: It is possible to accidently pay for something without meaning to, but only when you are very close to a card reader. The cashier would need to have activated the terminal, which would reduce the chance of accidental payments being taken.

Q: If I present my card to the reader twice, will I be charged twice?
A: No, the reader will only take one payment per transaction.

Q: Can I use the contactless function to get money out at a cash machine?
A: No, you will need to enter your PIN each time you use a cash machine.


Funeral costs comparison

March 28, 2017 Money Matters No Comments
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Funeral costs comparison


Death should not be a topic which we all avoid discussing – it is best to talk about death regardless of your age; remember it is a fact of life and your funeral service shouldn’t leave your family in debt.

We would recommend that you visit each of the Funeral Directors in Jersey to view their premises
and meet the staff who would be caring for your family. Each business offers bespoke personalised services and your relationship with the Funeral Director is really important throughout the planning and service stages.

“Understandable lack of shopping around by consumers at their lowest ebb, and an industry where costs can be opaque; the reality is a huge range in pricing, which could potentially save consumers hundreds of pounds”

Simon Cox, Consumer Protection Proposition Lead, Royal London Group1 SunLife’s annual 2016 report titled ‘The Cost of Dying’ is the fastest rising of any fixed cost in the UK – rising much faster than living costs, such as rent, food, utilities, insurance or clothing: ‘the funeral – which makes up 44% of the cost of dying – has soared by 5.5% in a single year. The average funeral in the UK now costs £3,897 which is more than double what it was when SunLife first started tracking funeral prices in 2004’.

Read more


Mis-selling of Financial Products

February 22, 2017 Money Matters No Comments
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The Jersey Financial Services Commission has launched a campaign this year to raise awareness in respect of the mis-selling of financial products. Of particular concern are cases when individuals with limited resources and little or no knowledge of complex investments have been advised to invest in high-risk products that are suitable for sophisticated and experienced investors only.

 

Here are some key points to remember when taking advise about a financial investment:

 

  • You may have a good relationship with your investment adviser but remember, ultimately this is a business transaction. In a small community, the lines between business and friendship can easily blur. Are you too close to the person advising you?
  • Assess the advice on the merits. Do you properly and fully understand what the risks are: Can you clearly explain those risks to a family member or friend in just a few short sentences?
  • Most members of the public are retail customers and not sophisticated investors – is the product been put forward for your consideration intended for the retail market or is it only suitable for sophisticated and experienced investors? If you don’t know the answer to this question, ask.
  • If you are invited to sign documents, make sure you have read and understood the contents of those documents. If you need more time, you are entitled to take it. Has your investment adviser set out in writing the key risk factors relating to your product? Do you agree with the risk profile that has been ascribed to you by your adviser? If you disagree, say so.
  • If you are advised to cash in early a relatively low risk investment or a pension, be extremely careful before agreeing to do so. This is particularly so if you are at or near retirement age.
  • Take a step back and ask: does it sound too good to be true?

 

The Financial Services Ombudsman is able to adjudicate on complaints arising from the mis-selling of financial products and the obvious advantage of this system is that the investor does not incur costs by engaging the Ombudsman. However, the Ombudsman cannot consider complaints arising from events prior to 1st January 2010 and can only award a maximum of £150,000 in compensation. For those investors who have suffered losses in excess of this sum, or who acquired a financial product prior to 2010, the appropriate step is to bring a claim in the Royal Court.

 


Jersey Telecom’s Billing Changes

February 10, 2017 Home life, Telecommunications No Comments
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Both Jersey Consumer Council and Citizens Advice Jersey have received numerous telephone calls and emails from concerned landline only JT customers in relation to the costs being introduced for paper bills and payment choices, other than direct debits.

 

Your heartfelt comments, frustrations and anger have all been shared with managers from JT. It has to be recognised that we cannot stop the tide of change but we can help consumers to move with the tide as much as possible.

 

Over the last few days we have been talking to JT on a daily basis to sort out some steps to help the vulnerable and land line only customers who are overwhelmed and frightened by the proposed changes.

 

The JT team are sympathetic and have listened to all of your questions, comments and criticisms. The following options are being offered to help;

 

  • JT Prime talk customers with no other products on a monthly Bill can switch to a quarterly bill to reduce bill charges
  • JT customers with multiple bills can arrange to have all their products on one bill to avoid duplicate charges
  • JT will contact selected Prime Talk customers with more information on Direct Debit payment options
  • You don’t have to print your bills – if you have an iPad for example but no printer you can still opt to pay using traditional methods i.e. cheque or cash (albeit at a charge) you will need to write down the Account number

 

JT have assured us that they ‘always abide by the direct debit guarantee and distribute bills at least 5 working days prior to a direct debit taken out.’

 

We are still talking to JT, as consumers continue to contact us with ideas and initiatives to help our community.

 

Dominic Vye, JT’s Head of Commercial Development, said: “The new billing structure aligns JT with the vast majority of our customers, who receive their bills online and pay by Direct Debit. As their numbers have grown so has the cost of paper billing and administering non-Direct Debit payments.

 

“But we were always conscious that some customers would be affected, which is why we are working closely with groups such as the JCC to make this transition as smooth as possible”.

 

If you still have concerns please telephone the Jersey Consumer Council on 611161 or leave a message.


Christmas Planner

November 29, 2016 Top tips No Comments
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Christmas Time

Do you feel under pressure and tempted to spend money that you cannot afford at Christmas? To help you stay within your budget, the Consumer Council has put together a food and present planner.

If you use this or any planner, you are less likely to exceed your budget, and your money should go further.

Can’t print it? We can pop a copy in the post to you. Please call on 611161 or email us at jcc@jerseyconsumercouncil.org.je

Read more…


Trading Standards & Consumer Council Top Ten for Christmas

November 3, 2016 Consumer Skills, Home life, Money Matters, Top tips No Comments
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Settle down with a warm drink and peruse our Christmas survival tips…ranging from call out charges to buying on line and the risks of fake products.

  1. Buying Online

In most cases if you shop online with a Jersey, UK or EU trader you have a right to cancel and receive a full refund, even if you just don’t like the goods or have simply changed your mind.

This is in addition to your normal statutory rights. There are some exceptions and time limits apply. Check it out before you buy. Extra tips here… http://www.jerseyconsumercouncil.org.je/consumer-skills/shopping-online/

 

  1. Product Safety

Be safe this Christmas. Follow the instructions and appropriate warnings. Make sure toys are CE marked and follow the intended age warnings.

 

  1. Know who you are buying from

If you are shopping online make sure you know who and where the trader is based. For example don’t assume you are buying from Amazon when you may be buying from an Amazon seller outside the EU.

Your goods may not comply with European safety standards, they may take a long time to arrive and the cost of returning them may be uneconomical.

 

  1.  Fakes


Don’t be tempted to buy really cheap branded goods online. Electrical goods may be a fire or electrical shock hazard and perfumes and cosmetics may contain harmful substances.

 

  1. Additional Protection

You get additional protection when you buy goods or services over £100 if you paid using your credit card. If something goes wrong and the trader won’t help, the credit card company may have to step in.

 

  1. Christmas Loans

If you have to borrow money, make sure they are a reputable lender. Do you understand exactly what you are signing up to and what will happen if your financial situation gets worse? Is the lender a subscriber to the Jersey Code of Consumer Lending?  See www.gov.je/tradingstandards/consumerlending

 

  1. Call out Charges

If you have to call out a tradesman for an emergency repair during this festive season make sure you know what the ‘call out’ or ‘minimum charge’ will be before you agree. Make sure you both understand what work will be carried out, what it will cost (or how it will be calculated) and when and how the trader expects payment.

 

  1. Faulty Goods

You have statutory rights if goods are faulty or not fit for purpose. Try to keep gift receipts as it will help if things go wrong and don’t delay in complaining.

 

  1. Unwanted Gifts

Your statutory rights do not apply if you simply changed your mind. Check out the store’s returns policy before you buy. Remember if you bought online, you may have additional rights.

 

  1. Recall and Safety Notices

Trading Standards publish product recalls and safety warnings. To sign up for notifications, visit www.mygov.je

You can select the category of goods you are interested in, for example food, toys, electrical goods and nursery products.

 

Finally, do you know where to get help? Trading Standards offer a free and confidential Consumer Advice Service. The drop in service is located under the clock in the Central Market. 
You don’t need an appointment. Alternatively you can call on 448160 or email tradingstandards@gov.je


Are you paying unnecessary IPT?

September 7, 2016 Insurances No Comments
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Are you paying unnecessary IPT?

Insurance Premium Tax (IPT) is a UK tax applied to general insurance premiums. There are two rates. 
Standard at 9.5% and a higher rate of 20% for travel insurance, mechanical / electrical appliances insurance and some vehicle insurance.

Premiums for risks located outside the UK are usually exempt. Therefore if you are taking out an insurance policy with a UK supplier, ask about exempting IPT before you enter into the contract or renewal.

Some suppliers may ask you to fill out an IPT exemption declaration form confirming your residential status as being permanently outside of the UK for the period of insurance. It is likely that you will have to return this before the supplier deducts the IPT. Ask what the arrangements are before you sign up or renew. In most cases they will not refund retrospective overpayments.

3 Recent Case Studies
Mick and Pam have private medical insurance. They are automatically charge IPT even though the supplier knows they are non-UK residents. In the past, they used to send Mick an IPT exemption form to fill out with their annual renewal. When it was returned they would send out a revised renewal with the IPT removed. They have stopped this practice and it is now down to Mick to request and send in this form on renewal and he will not receive a reminder. Remembering to follow these steps on renewal has reduced their premiums by £60 per month, although the provider will not entertain a retrospective refund for the couple of years Mick did not realise he was being charged IPT.

Vicky and her friends required travel insurance for a European holiday. As they booked through one particular operator, they opted for their travel insurance which was available online (through a third party provider). After obtaining a quotation, Vicky resisted the temptation to pay there and then. Instead, she called the provider giving her quotation reference and asked for the IPT to be deducted. After a little convincing and reference to their own website to prove the policy extends to Jersey, the provider was happy to take payment over the phone for the insurance cover less the IPT and the insurance policy was then emailed to Vicky.


Finally, Rob had experienced a few problems with hire cars. On one occasion he refuelled his hire car with the wrong type of fuel which turned out to be a costly mistake! He was also concerned that he would have a high insurance excess but felt the additional insurance available on the hire car desk seemed to him to be excessive (often referred to as Excess Waiver Insurance, Super CDW). As he was likely to hire other vehicles in the coming year he decided to look into an annual car hire excess insurance policy. He found one online that included £6,000 towards the hire car excess, £1000 towards misfuelling and other key benefits. Whilst ‘checking out’ he couldn’t see how IPT could be deducted. He sent the provider an email enquiry and they came back to him advising that if he took out the policy and sent them the policy number and the last 4 digits of the payment card used to pay for the policy, they would be happy to refund the IPT within 5 working days. Rob is now driving his hire car safe in the knowledge that he has comprehensive annual European car hire excess cover but also paid a reasonable price less the IPT!

Check out your insurance policies and let us know if you are paying unnecessary UK IPT. How much can you save?


Registering for a manufacturer’s free warranty or guarantee

May 11, 2016 Consumer Skills, Home life No Comments
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You are in a rush to get your new gadget or kitchen appliance out of the packaging.

You may have seen a warranty or guarantee card fall out of the box. What exactly is it for and should you fill it in? Trading Standards has provided answers to these questions.

What is the card for?

The card enables you to register for a free warranty (or guarantee) which adds to your legal rights. It may be a condition to fill in and return the card before the warranty becomes valid.

 

Do I need this additional free warranty?

It may be easier to claim on the free warranty for a repair or replacement if something has gone wrong. Under the law, after 6 months you have to prove you didn’t cause the problem, which can be tricky. It is also a good backup if the retailer has closed or gone out of business or you bought the goods out of the Island.

 

Have I still got a manufacturer’s warranty if I didn’t fill out and return the card?

It depends. Get in touch with the manufacturer. They may still accept your registration and you may be able to do this online.

 

Who can claim?

It is usually just the person who purchased the item who can make a claim. Check the small print. Some warranties extend to other people, referred to as ‘third party rights’.

 

Are there other limitations?

Check the terms and conditions. There will be strict time limits when the warranty expires. Find out who is responsible for the postage and packaging if goods need to be sent away for repair.

 

Are there other benefits of registration?

The manufacturer will have your contact details if your goods are then subject to a safety notice or recall.

 

What about extended warranties?

Take care when filling out warranty or guarantee registration cards to ensure you are only registering for a free warranty or guarantee. Don’t confuse it with extended warranties or guarantees which are similar to insurance policies. These cost money. You should think carefully about the benefit of buying an extended warranty against the value of the goods, the risk of them breaking down and always shop around as you may be able to purchase a multiple product policy for less money.

 

Do I have any protection without a manufacturer’s warranty?

Yes. Under Jersey law you are protected if goods are faulty if they are not of satisfactory quality or fit to do the job intended. You may also have additional protection if the goods were over £100 and you paid in full or part payment on a credit card.

 

For more advice, contact Trading Standards on 448160 or tradingstandards@gov.je