Newsletter

Jersey Consumer Council

Tag: home life

Food Prices up by 5%

June 15, 2018 Home life No Comments

Four family favourite recipes have risen in cost on average by 5% from mid-January to mid-May this year. Our research is based on Caring Cooks recipes for chicken pie, cottage pie, flapjacks and fruit crumble with ingredients being purchased from Coop, Food Hall, Iceland, Tesco-Alliance and Waitrose.

At a glance, you can see that although Iceland offers the 4 recipes at the lowest cost, their prices have risen by a hefty 10.7% over our initial 5 months of price watching.

Interestingly Waitrose is the second most expensive of our five supermarkets for the recipes but their overall price has dropped by -0.25%.

In isolation food cost rise may not be a show stopper but let’s add in energy costs; http://www.jerseyfuelwatch.com/oil shows that home heating oil has risen by 18% for the same period, petrol by 6%, electricity costs have just risen by 2% and gas 1.9%

Our price checker experienced a few difficulties and faced the stark frustrations on each collection day of essential items being out of stock, available packet sizes varying and confused pricing (with one product having 3 different prices in one store)

All resulting in additional visits for us, but for shoppers with limited time and budgets last minute substitutions and unwanted cost implications. Which is stressful and all too often financially unmanageable.

The simple potato caused us a headache as the bags vary between 2.5kgs and 1.5kgs – be diligent when it comes to sizes and costings. The simple mixed herb was startling with a branded refill product costing 18p per gram and own label 6p per gram. Leeks one month £1.49 for 500 grams and the next month £1.57 for 400 grams allegedly including 25% extra free!

Therefore, be substitution ready, sometimes bulk up your cooking with cheaper ingredients and use less meat, and make use of offers as long as they are labelled correctly when they come along.

 

Coop Jan-18 Feb-18 Mar-18 Apr-18 May-18
Fruit Crumble 1.84 1.85 1.87 1.87 1.87
Cottage Pie 4.83 4.84 4.97 4.97 4.97
Chicken Pie 6.26 6.48 6.51 6.51 6.63
Flap Jack 1.43 1.43 1.50 1.50 1.50
  14.36 14.60 14.85 14.85 14.97
           
Food Hall Jan-18 Feb-18 Mar-18 Apr-18 May-18
Fruit Crumble 2.02 2.02 2.02 2.02 2.02
Cottage Pie 7.56 7.54 7.55 7.55 8.20
Chicken Pie 7.27 7.28 7.28 7.77 7.80
Flap Jack 1.80 1.80 1.80 1.80 1.80
  18.65 18.64 18.65 19.14 19.82
           
Iceland Jan-18 Feb-18 Mar-18 Apr-18 May-18
Fruit Crumble 1.61 1.61 1.62 1.63 1.85
Cottage Pie 4.46 4.46 4.49 5.22 5.20
Chicken Pie 5.55 5.57 5.90 5.96 5.95
Flap Jack 1.52 1.52 1.52 1.55 1.55
  13.14 13.16 13.53 14.36 14.55
           
Tesco Jan-18 Feb-18 Mar-18 Apr-18 May-18
Fruit Crumble 1.99 2.00 2.00 2.01 2.01
Cottage Pie 4.20 4.12 4.30 4.34 4.90
Chicken Pie 6.42 6.42 6.42 6.55 6.66
Flap Jack 1.50 1.51 1.51 1.45 1.45
  14.11 14.05 14.23 14.35 15.02
           
Waitrose Jan-18 Feb-18 Mar-18 Apr-18 May-18
Fruit Crumble 1.66 1.77 1.77 1.77 1.77
Cottage Pie 5.61 5.63 5.53 5.61 5.66
Chicken Pie 7.21 7.32 7.34 7.34 6.66
Flap Jack 1.52 1.66 1.66 1.66 1.66
  16.00 16.38 16.30 16.38 15.75

 


Better Protection for your Personal Information

May 25, 2018 Consumer Skills No Comments

The General Data Protection Regulation is fundamentally about protecting individuals’ personal information in relation to the way that it is used by businesses. The concept of Data Protection is founded in protecting our human right to a private life.

The introduction of the new European GDPR in late May 2018 and Jersey Laws will drastically change the way businesses can collect, store and protect the personal information of their customers, clients, and even visitors to a website. It should be noted that whilst aspects of the GDPR and the new Jersey Laws are new, many of the requirements build upon the existing Data Protection legislative framework.

This means GDPR will cover all of our personal information

collected and used by businesses.

GDPR defines personal information as anything that can be used to directly or indirectly identify the person. Names, photos, email addresses, bank details, posts on social networking websites, medical information or IP addresses. Our personal information is a currency which should be respected and only used how we expect it to be used.

CONSUMER ESSENTIALS

Before you give YOUR information look for the PRIVACY NOTICE – businesses must be able to tell you about why and how they intend to use your information.   In some circumstances, you will be expected to CONSENT’ to the use of your information. In terms of consent, consent is one of a number of lawful bases for processing and it may be that organisations do not always need consent to process consumer’s data. In cases where they rely on consent, then that consent will need to be a positive, affirmative and unambiguous action confirming consent on the part of the consumer; for example, you will be required to opt into subscriptions rather than businesses relying on people to opt out.

The law gives all of us INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS in relation to our personal information. In simple terms the rights you can exercise are;

  • To access the information a business holds on you;
  • To get your information corrected
  • To ask for the erasure of personal information;
  • To stop direct marketing;
  • Control over automated decision making & profiling;
  • A right to information portability between controllers.

Businesses failing to look after our personal information according to the law face a tougher ENFORCEMENT approach by the Jersey Office of the Information Commissioner (OIC).

For more information contact the OIC, or visit their website at www.oicjersey.org. 

Telephone: +44 (0)1534 716530

 


GDPR – What is it all about?

April 23, 2018 Consumer Skills, Top tips No Comments

General Data Protection Regulations will drastically change the way businesses can collect, store and protect the personal information of their customers, clients, and even visitors to a website.

GDPR defines personal data as anything that can be used to directly or indirectly identify the person. Names, photos, email addresses, bank details, posts on social networking websites, medical information or IP addresses.

It is a Europe-wide set of data protection laws designed to harmonise data privacy practice across Europe. The emphasis is on protecting citizens and their data, and giving users more information about and control over how it’s used. The new regulations will come into force by May 2018.

It should be noted that whilst aspects of the GDPR are new, many of the requirements build upon the existing Data Protection legislative framework.

This means it will cover all of our personal information collected and used by businesses.

CONSUMER ESSENTIALS before you give YOUR information look for the PRIVACY NOTICE – businesses must be able to tell you about why and how they intend to use your information.   Plus, you will be expected to CONSENT to the use of your information. In terms of consent, consent is one of a number of lawful bases for processing and it may be that organisations do not always need consent to process consumer’s data. In cases where they rely on consent, then that consent will need to be a positive, affirmative and unambiguous action confirming consent on the part of the consumer.

The law gives all of us INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS in relation to our personal information and these are detailed below.

Businesses failing to look after our personal information according to the law face a tougher ENFORCEMENT approach by the Data Protection Authority. See below.

Privacy Notices

Empowering individuals by being transparent and clear about how their data are going to be processed, and by whom, is a key element of compliance with the GDPR.   At every point at which personal data are collected, whether that is from your clients, staff or others, review how you intend to provide the following at the time of collection:

  • Purpose of and legal basis for processing;
  • Recipients of the data;
  • Any third countries data are transferred to and safeguards in place;
  • Data retention periods;
  • The existence of individual’s rights;
  • Right to withdraw consent where provided;
  • Data Protection Officer’s contact details;
  • Whether data provision has statutory or contractual basis;
  • Details where the legitimate interest condition has been relied upon

Consent

The GDPR considers consent an important part of ensuring individuals have control and an understanding of how their data are to be processed.

  • Consent must be:
    • Freely given
    • Specific
    • Informed
    • Unambiguous
  • There has to be a positive indication of agreement.
  • Consent as a basis for processing gives individuals stronger rights.
  • Data controllers must be able to evidence consent was given.
  • Parental consent to process children’s† data on the internet. With regards to children’s consent, this is only required for ‘information society services’ (i.e. paid for internet services) and our law says parental consent is required for a child under 13 years, unless the data has been pseudonymised i.e. meaning that for example a name is replaced with a unique number to render the data record less identifying.

 the legal definition of a child will be determined at the law drafting stage with the upper age limit required to be within the range of 13-16 years

Individual’s Rights

Individual’s rights are enhanced and extended in a number of important areas. They include:

  • A right of access to data (Subject Access);
  • A right for the correction of data where inaccuracies have been identified;
  • A right to require the erasure of personal data, in certain circumstances (often referred to as the ‘right to be forgotten’);
  • A right to prevent direct marketing;
  • Control over automated decision making & profiling;
  • A right to data portability between controllers

Penalties and Data Breaches

The GDPR provides for a tougher enforcement approach by the Data Protection Authority including the ability to impose significant fines.

  • Data breaches must be reported to Data Protection Authority within 72 hours of discovery
  • Individuals impacted should be told where there exists a high risk to their rights and freedoms e.g. identity theft, personal safety
  • Fines can be issued up to €10 million under the Jersey Law
  • Data Protection Authority can issue reprimands, warnings and bans as well as fines.

For more information please see;

https://oicjersey.org/data-protection-new-law/

https://thinkgdpr.org/overview/


Complaining or Complimenting?

March 6, 2018 Consumer Skills, Home life No Comments

We all enjoy a spot of praise now and again, and remember to praise where praise is due. Express your thanks when something goes well. BUT if you find yourself in a position of being dissatisfied with a product or service, follow our simple guide to making an effective complaint.

  1. In the first instance, give the business an opportunity to put things right. We all make mistakes, and a good business can be judged on successful complaints handling.
  2. Find out if the business has a complaints procedure and promptly follow it. If they don’t, ask. If the business is a member of a trade association or signed up to a code of conduct, that body may have a separate complaint handling procedure.
  3. It may be helpful to make it clear that you are making a formal complaint and then go on to:

* Identify yourself, quoting your customer number or any other references.

* Tell them briefly why you are unhappy/dissatisfied and what the problem is in   chronological order.

*Include supporting evidence: photographs, surveys, independent test reports, invoices, screen shots. Copies will do. Keep the originals.

*Set out what the impact of the problem on you has been e.g. any financial loss, inconvenience or distress.

*Say how the issue made you feel and what you want done to either put matters right or compensate you for their failings.

*If you are suggesting a monetary figure, you may want to explain how you came by that figure.

*If you are filling in an online complaints form and you have to categorise your submission, make sure you select complaint rather than comment. Complaints should be taken seriously and require action; comments can be ignored!

*Keep good records. Don’t assume you will be sent a copy of your online submission via e-mail when you press send or submit. Be prepared to take a screen shot and note down any reference numbers.

Monitor the businesses actions against those in their complaints handling procedures, remembering to keep copies of all documentation, emails, key actions, notes of conversations, and dates.

If the business fails to resolve the complaint to your satisfaction, there may be other sources of help or avenues for progressing the complaint. For example, the Channel Islands Financial Ombudsman is an independent body that resolves complaints about financial services provided from Jersey, Guernsey, Alderney and Sark. It has powers to investigate complaints and can compel financial services providers to pay compensation if it upholds a complaint.

progress your complaint and advise on your rights and all complaints relating to consumer goods and services.

The Channel Islands Financial Ombudsman is a free alternative
to taking a dispute with a financial products and services to court. They are independent, informal and confidential.

The Channel Islands Financial Ombudsman,

PO Box 114,

JE4 9QG

 

Tel: 01534 748610

Email: enquiries@ci-fo.org

https://www.ci-fo.org

 

Additional information:

https://www.jerseyfsc.org/pdf/The-Ombudsman-and-how-to-make-Consumer-Complaints-Nov-2015.pdf

For all other complaints relating to consumer goods or services contact Trading Standards.

Trading Standards,

9-13 Central Market,

St Helier,

JE2 4WL

 

Tel: 01534 448160

Email: tradingstandards@gov.je

www.gov.je/tradingstandards

 


Who is CICRA and what does it do?

October 27, 2017 Home life, Money Matters, Telecommunications No Comments

CICRA (the Channel Islands Competition and Regulatory Authorities) is the independent organisation working on your behalf to ensure you receive the best value, choice and access to high quality services but what does that mean in practice for you, the consumer?

Over a series of articles, we will explain a bit more about CICRA’s role across the Channel Islands and particularly here in Jersey.

CICRA is one of several local organisations, including Trading Standards, Citizens Advice and the Jersey Consumer Council, that work to inform and protect the rights of islanders. As individual organisations we are relatively small but in partnership we support each other to ensure the best outcomes for you.

CICRA regulates the telecoms sector, Jersey Post and Ports of Jersey (the airport, harbour and marinas) and is responsible for administering and enforcing the local competition law

CICRA informs–

CICRA provides the information you need to make important purchasing decisions.

We publish telecoms customer satisfaction ratings and undertake independent mystery shopping surveys on the different telecoms providers. We’ll shortly be publishing the results of the first ever check on local mobile coverage as well as the results of the latest mobile mast emissions audit. We’re looking at quality of service delivered by Ports of Jersey at the airport, harbour and marinas and will be reporting on that later this year.

We involve government and local interest groups when changes to policy or law should be considered; for example our work on reviewing the supply of road fuel in Jersey led to a change in the law to require prices to be visibly displayed from the roadside at all outlets ensuring you are in a position to be fully informed and to shop around.

CICRA protects–

CICRA protects local business and consumers from anticompetitive behaviour by enforcing competition law.

We watch out for any businesses potentially causing consumer harm. This may be price fixing between competitors or   unfairly obstructing other providers from serving you. The competition law spans all business sectors and not just those we regulate.

For the telecoms sector, Jersey Post and Ports of Jersey, we have a more active role in setting ‘the rules’ by which the businesses operate as we licence these businesses. We can set prices, quality of service targets and hold these businesses to account when things go wrong – all to ensure that the interests of fair dealing businesses and local consumers are protected. For example, we’ve recently required JT to reduce its landline prices by 13% over the next two years and we’re keeping a closer watch on Jersey Post quality of service after it experienced a dip in performance.

We can prevent or amend proposed mergers and acquisitions where there would be a detrimental impact on choice locally. Recently we made sure Sandpiper’s acquisition of the Costcutter shops was modified to protect consumer choice in St Ouen, St John and Green Island.

While we are able to resolve most issues informally sometimes this is not possible; we have the power to mandate changes and to issue fines. This is very much a last resort. We’ve fined the States of Jersey for breaching the law after it created a monopoly for itself in the emptying of septic and tight tanks by restricting access to another business, Bellozane from operating in the same sector. We’ve also fined JT when it tried to fix the minimum selling price of its pay-as-you-go SIM packs.

CICRA needs to ensure it continues to focus on what is important to you as a local consumer. We’re very grateful for the help provided by islanders recently, through participation in our annual telecoms satisfaction surveys and our focus groups discussing the quality of service provided by Ports of Jersey.

In the next article we will explain in more detail CICRA’s role with the harbour, airport and marinas in Jersey.


Peer-to-Peer Lending Explained

September 6, 2017 Banking, Consumer Skills, Money Matters No Comments

Peer-to-peer lending, also known as Private Lending, involves matching up investors, who are willing to lend, with borrowers – either private individuals or small businesses. We are sharing this article with you to raise awareness that peer to peer lending is a private arrangement and comes bearing significant risks; attractive as a solution but be cautious and understand exactly what you are signing up to.

By cutting out the middleman and not having the overheads of traditional banks, peer-to-peer lending may offer more favourable rates, or help borrowers who have struggled to get a personal loan elsewhere.

What are the risks as an investor?

By being connected directly to someone who wants to borrow, the most immediate risk to your money is if a borrower fails to repay what you’ve lent them (known as ‘defaulting’).

Your money is also not protected by the Depositors Compensation Scheme which guarantees your savings with Jersey banks up to the value of £50,000.

 

What are the risks as a borrower?

  1. Loans are usually granted on an interest-only basis (meaning you repay no capital) and for a short duration, typically 1 to 3 years.
  2. You would normally still need to have a deposit, or a stake in whatever property you’re putting up as the asset (sometimes called the security).
  3. At the end of the term, the loan is either paid off by some means, such as replacing with a conventional bank mortgage or selling the property, or in some cases the loan can be renewed for a further period. Take care, if you have struggled to obtain a traditional mortgage and your financial situation has not improved you have no guarantee of obtaining a traditional mortgage at the end of the term to enable you to continue to live in the property. What will you do if the value of the property goes down?
  4. Interest rates can vary, depending on the lender and their appetite or consideration of the risks involved.
  5. While the rate of return may be favourable to the investor/lender, the interest rate for the borrower can be higher than high street lending and much higher arrangement and early redemption penalties.
  6. Borrowers may intend for the loan to be a short term, interim solution before moving to mainstream mortgage lending but if they are still in the same circumstances at the end, the loan can be rolled over (and over) which just continues the difficulty.
  7. We strongly recommend that you ask any lender about the Jersey Code of Consumer Lending; this is a voluntary or ‘self-regulatory’ code, which sets standards of good lending practice. These standards seek to ensure that Jersey consumers are treated fairly and that the opportunities for taking on excessive financial commitments are reduced. The Consumer Council is working hard with industry, Jersey Financial Services Commission, Citizens Advice, Trading Standards and the Financial Services Unit, Chief Minister’s Department to update the Code and to raise awareness of its importance as it provides various safeguards for consumers. The Financial Ombudsman will take codes of practice into account when determining a complaint. The Code exists even whilst it is being updated, it can be found at this link gov.je/tradingstandards/consumerlending and remains fully relevant.
  8. The Channel Islands Financial Ombudsman (CIFO) is an independent organisation that resolves complaints about financial services with powers to investigate complaints and award compensation. If you take a loan from an individual, rather than a lending business, you may not be able to complain about them to CIFO. Contact details ci-fo.org and 01534-748610.

What advice do we have for consumers?

Ask yourself why it is important for you to take on additional risk with peer-to-peer lending?

Will your financial situation improve with hard work over time so you can access the traditional mortgage market?

Do you have other housing options? Possibly rental

Our advice is to get professional, qualified and independent legal and financial advice before making any decisions. Don’t let the excitement of a new home cloud your judgement on such a large long term financial commitment. This may be the largest financial decision you ever make – don’t let it be the worst!

Make sure you have a professional valuation on the property you are thinking of buying. Consider if your property will be adequately insured – life insurance, critical illness, building and contents?

Terry Vaughan, Director, Head of Risk and Compliance at The Mortgage Shop and Henley Financial highlighted that If you’re a borrower, your lawyers need to make sure the person granting the loan has the authority and legal right to do so. Your professional adviser will also check on source of funds for the loan being proposed. You also need to ensure the terms are suitable for you. You need to be aware of the repayment schedule and be sure that it is within your budget”

 

Reference

http://www.which.co.uk/money/investing/types-of-investment/guides/peer-to-peer-investing/peer-to-peer-lending-explained


Take time to think and plan when cooking on a limited budget

September 6, 2017 Budget, Consumer Skills, Home life, Money Matters No Comments

Eating on a budget, finding timeand having the confidence to prepare meals from scratch, are why sometimes many find it difficult. With a bit of planning, using leftovers and just giving it a go, it does get easier.

A good place to start is a weekly menu plan and a budget, which will help you get into the habit of knowing what your weekly shop will cost. Allocate one or two days for a pasta dish, they are cheap, quick with many variations, such as meatballs and spaghetti, ham and pea or simply fresh tomato sauce, all of which should cost under £5.

Sunday is a great day for a roast as you will have more time, plus you can use the leftovers for a dish or two during the week. Why not buy a bigger chicken and strip the carcass down to create a chicken and leek pie on Monday, or a chicken curry with some simple flat- breads another day?

Once you become confident with creating really simple dishes, you’ll find yourself building several weekly meal planners which you can just use time and time again. Because after all, we need these things to be simple.

Caring Cooks have a range of cost effective recipes allowing you to try your planning, shopping and cooking skills. Caring Cooks are treating us all to a Cookery demonstration 27th September Coop Grande Marche St. Helier 12:30 – 13:30 pm.

Let’s get started…

  1. Work out your weekly grocery budget (planners available by post or http://www.jerseyconsumercouncil.org.je/money-matters/budget-planner/).
  2. Plan out a weekly menu (recipes available by post or http://www.caringcooksofjersey.com).
  3. Write out your shopping list; including weight of ingredients.
  4. Be disciplined when you shop and stick to your budget. Where possible ‘Shop the Offers’. Get familiar with your supermarket’s offer cycles.
  5. Allow planning and preparation to be a priority. This gives you timeto batch-cook and freeze where appropriate. There is no need to feel guilty about time spent planning and cooking.
  6. Enjoy your cooking, keep budgeting and planning.

If you would like to learn new skillsand confidence in the kitchen, and are over 16, please get in touch with Caring Cooks to find out more.

Recipes which share ingredients and are simple to make can be found here on Caring Cooks website:

www.caringcooksofjersey.com

 


What type of Life Insurance Policy should I buy?

August 30, 2017 Insurances, Money Matters No Comments

Most people have two or three main protection needs that can be covered by Life Insurance (often known as Life Assurance):

 

  • Paying off large debts such as your mortgage in the event of your death.
  • Family protection, where you leave behind money for your family to live on after you’ve died.
  • Funeral expenses

Different types of insurance policies are good for different protection needs:

 

Term Assurance

The most basic type of life insurance is called term insurance, where you choose the amount you want to be insured for and the period for which you want cover. If you die within the chosen period, the policy pays out. If you don’t die during the term, the policy doesn’t pay out and the premiums you have paid are not returned to you.

 

There are three main types of term insurances to consider: level term, decreasing term and family income benefit. Sometimes a combination is the best answer.

 

  • Level Term Life Insurance

A level term policy pays out a lump sum if you die within the specified term. The amount you’re covered for remains level throughout the term – hence the name. The monthly or annual premiums you pay usually stay the same, as well.

 

Level term policies can be a good option for family protection, where you want to leave a lump sum that your family can invest to live on after you’ve gone. It can also be a good option if you need a specified amount of cover for a certain length of time, e.g. to cover an interest-only mortgage.

 

You might also consider including an automatic annual increase of the sum assured to counteract the effects of inflation or increasing expenses. There are even budget versions where the monthly cost is lower during the first few years.

 

 

  • Decreasing Term Life Insurance

With a decreasing term policy, the amount you’re covered for decreases over the term of the policy. These policies are often used to cover a debt that reduces over time, such as a repayment mortgage.

Premiums are usually significantly cheaper than for level-term cover as the amount insured reduces as time goes on.

 

  • Family Income Benefit Life Insurance

Family income benefit life insurance is a type of decreasing term policy. Instead of a lump sum, though, it pays out a regular income until the policy’s expiry date if you die.

 

The upside of family income benefit is that it is easier to work out how much you need. For example, if you take home £2,000 a month, you can arrange for the same amount to be paid out to your family if you die.

 

 

Whole-of-Life

As the name suggests, whole-of-life policies are ongoing policies that pay out when you die, whenever that is. Because it’s guaranteed that you’ll die at some point (and therefore that the policy will have to pay out), these policies are more expensive than term assurance policies, which only pay out if you die within a certain timeframe. These are often used when cover is required for funeral expenses.

 

The good news is that Life Cover in general is now more affordable, and most importantly can provide you with  peace of mind, knowing that your family will be financially protected in the event of your passing away.

 

 

For and on behalf of Cherry Godfrey Insurance Services (Jersey) Ltd  

Regulated by The Jersey Financial Services Commission in the carrying on of investment and general insurance mediation business

 


Trading Standards credit card warning: online payments where you lose protection

August 30, 2017 Banking, Home life, Money Matters No Comments

A little-known flaw in the Consumer Credit Act may put Jersey shoppers at risk of losing their money if things go wrong.

 

Under Section 75 of the UK Consumer Credit Act, shoppers who make payments between £100 and £30,000 on a credit card can get their money back if the goods turn out to be faulty, not as described or don’t arrive. The UK law makes the retailer and credit card company jointly liable. Jersey consumers usually benefit from this protection due to terms and conditions reflecting the UK Consumer Credit Act.

 

However, a little-known loophole revealed by a MoneySavingExpert means that consumers will only be reimbursed if there is a direct link between the customer, their credit card provider and the supplier. If the payment is processed by a third-party company then the protection under Section 75 does not apply.

 

So, if you bought a concert ticket through an agent on a credit card, you may not be able to get your money back using Section 75 if it doesn’t arrive.

The same may apply if you booked a holiday through a travel agent. However, the travel industry may very well have their own financial protection schemes in place.

 

You may also not be covered for credit card transactions made through online payment platforms, such as PayPal, because it breaks the chain between customer and supplier.  However, if the firm you’re buying from has a “Commercial Entity Agreement” you’ll be able to make a claim under Section 75 even if you use PayPal. PayPal has its own Buyer Protection scheme. This covers online purchases made on eBay and other websites if the item does not arrive or match the seller’s description. Property, vehicles, custom-made items and industrial machinery are among some items that are not guaranteed.

 

Amazon is another firm where Section 75 may not apply. Shoppers who buy items on a credit card from third-party suppliers on the online marketplace will not be covered. If you buy directly from Amazon then you could make a claim.

 

Confused, it is not surprising! Trading Standards offers the following advice:

  • Know who you are buying from and who will take your payment
  • Wherever possible put payments on your credit card
  • If you are entitled to protection, you are still covered even if a small proportion, part payment or deposit was paid using your card
  • When things go wrong, don’t delay. If you don’t have Section 75 protection you may alternative protection through platform buyer protection schemes, but these are often time limited.

 

Free confidential consumer advice is available from Trading Standards on 448162 or email tradingstandards@gov.je. You can also drop in, they are in the Central Market under the clock.

 


Occasionally when we buy goods or services we’re asked to pay a deposit… but what are our rights?

August 30, 2017 Consumer Skills, Home life, Money Matters No Comments

When we pay a deposit, we are committing to a binding contract with the outstanding payment to be paid at a later date. The natural position of the Law is that the deposit will not be refunded should you decide you do not want the goods or services. You should be aware that the trader may be in a position to pursue you for the outstanding money.

 

For example, when ordering a wedding dress or prom dress, we are usually required to pay something upfront. It is always recommended that you ask whether the amount it is refundable or not, and if it is, ask the person to indicate the term on the receipt or by email.

 

For further advice on this matter or any other consumer issues, please contact Trading Standards on 01534 44160.